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Transcript

Demonstration – ZFS Storage Appliance Details

Oracle ZFS Storage Appliances – Demonstration  ZFS Storage Appliance Details (Part 6 of 6)

 

>> Mick:  Now we’re going to look at the Storage Appliance in some detail.

 

[pause]

 

The first thing we’re going to do is just have a quick look through the different menus that you see here at the top. You can see that within the different menus – can you see here you have services, storage, network, etc. on the configuration? These are maintenance menu which allows you to do things with the system.

 

For example, do a reset which is what I have to do every time I want to start from scratch for example. I can create shares. I can look at the system status and my status screen showing various analytics or I can generate specific analytics.

 

[pause]

 

Just let’s get started by showing you how I can add statistic, say a percent utilization of the CPU and instantly I’ll get a nice graph coming up. I can add another statistic like network interface statistics. I can go on like this creating whatever statistics I like. Using these little buttons here, these icons, I can show a minute of data, show an hour. Obviously, the appliance would need to be running for some time before I could actually show these in full detail – show a full day, etc. I can represent data by different types of graph. You can see pretty detailed information is available.

 

[pause]

 

Let’s go back. What I’ll do is start by going into configuration and I’ll create a user account. The analogy would be just like creating a user on a Microsoft system or Unix box. I’ll click on plus (+), I’ll create a user. ZFSuser1, local only, not on the network directory. Clear the password.

 

[pause]

 

The things here require sessionalization. It would mean if they user logged in, they have to type a reason as to why they’re logging in, if they have some sort of admin function on the Storage Appliance. I only want to use the user for authenticating when I access the share. If I click kiosk user, that would then restrict what they could see when they use the browser interface to look at the Storage Appliance.

 

[pause]

 

I’m going to add the user then I’m going to go into shares. Rather than create a single share, which I could do, I’m going to go into projects so I can categorize my share under project which will make it easier for me to manage a bit later. I’m going to add a project called SkillBuilders.

 

[pause]

 

Now I’m going to go back into shares and bring up my projects, select SkillBuilders. Now when I create a file system that will be associated with that project (as you can see) and I’m going to create a share called reports owned by the user I’ve just created, zfsuser1. Here I can set my permissions, which you can see are Unix permission groups, and I can click on individual permissions. I’m just going to leave read-write execute for owner at the moment.

 

[pause]

 

From there I’ve created a share. Now you might say, “How would you see this?” Just like any other share. If I go into a remote session, I’m going to log into a local system, logging in as zfsuser1. I’ve got the equivalent user account setup on my Solaris 10 system.

 

[pause]

 

If I do showmount-c, I can see the report share is exported. Note the default mount point export report which I can change if I want to but everything is shared from /export.

 

In order to mount this manually I would need to become root on my Solaris box and then mount mnt directory and /mnt. As you may be aware, if you’re used to Solaris, it is always a mnt directory that’s handy for mounting stuff. Usually it is.

 

[pause]

 

Maybe I’ve already got it mounted. Let’s make a different directory. That’s better.

 

[pause]

 

>> Dave:  A couple of questions in the queue, Mick. Is this a good time?

 

[pause]

 

>> Mick:  Fire away, Dave.

 

[pause]

 

>> Dave:  You’re using the command line now and as far as the configuration that you did before, can command line be used for the ZFS Storage Appliance?

 

>> Mick:  Yes. The command line can be used under any circumstances that I’m showing you graphical facilities for. In fact, the command line has more capability than the browser interface.

 

In this particular window here – I’m actually logged into a different system so I’m actually accessing the share from a Solaris machine. As you can see, I have mounted it but I cd to it, even though I’m root, it won’t allow me. If I drop back to my ZFS user and then cd, I’m in because that was the user I used to identify the system when I created the report share.

 

Just to show you hopefully I can make a directory – and there we are. I could always start adding data but because it’s an emulated system, the performance isn’t particularly good. But you can see that I can indeed share and I can access the share and I can control access to it for user, and so forth.

 

[pause]

 

If I go back to shares – there’s my share that I’ve created – it’s important to note, imagine I want to edit that and I can’t see an edit button anywhere. If I point to it, notice how you can now see the edit. So I can go in and I can change aspects, I could add a quota which is a limitation of the amount of space it could use. A reservation is a guarantee of a minimum amount of space which is ZFS facility in its own right.

 

[pause]

 

I could add up the facilities to that share, make data compression.

 

[pause]

 

I choose from a variety of compression characteristics and a variety of other properties at the same time. Then click “Apply” to have those take effect.

 

Lots of properties you can apply or you can just leave everything to inherit from the main project directory. Again, this is a facility of ZFS where you create within your pool when you’re creating a share like this. You’re effectively creating what’s known as a dataset which you can view a separate file system, which in itself has a whole variety of properties assigned to it such that if you then create other things within it, those datasets inherit the properties of the parent which is what you’re doing with one, which is a very powerful facility. I can do things like take snapshots.

 

[pause]

 

Just a snaphot. Give it a name.

 

[pause]

 

They are taking the snapshot just like that of that report share, which means anything that is now created we’ll probably see being reflected in the file system, but if I change my mind later or something goes wrong, I can revert back to this one and so on. Bear in mind, I’m doing this through the graphical interface and in situations like this where I might have multiple file systems, I would probably be better off using the command line interface and the script to do things like snapshotting. Replication…

 

[pause]

 

I can do a variety of replications which somebody was asking about just now.

 

[pause]

 

If we go back to our share here…

 

[pause]

 

Start copying the data across to the share and then we have a look at analytics. We should be able to see – there we go – some activity starting to happen.

 

[pause]

 

Not an awful lot because it didn’t copy very much, but at least you can see it.

 

>> Dave:  Mick, any scripting capabilities?

 

[pause]

 

>> Mick:  Yes, there are, from the command line, there are scripting capabilities. Certainly, yes. Any commands that you might input at the command line, you can script them so you can do repetitive things. There are control statements just like in [11:45 inaudible] program and language that you can use, as well.

 

[pause]

 

A thing about the shares – one other thing I’d like to show you in the last few minutes is if we’d look at configuration and the services that are currently available, you can see the NFS and SCSI are actually switched on. Currently, we only have NFS share. We don’t have an SCSI one. But we might like to create a Microsoft share that I could access from my laptop. The SMB service isn’t currently switched on, so let’s click on it.

 

[pause]

 

This is just the generic service that is built in to the Solaris system.

 

[pause]

 

And when we click on “Apply,” it says, “You made changes,” and “It’s currently disabled. Would you like to enable it?” I’ll enable it.

 

[pause]

 

Let’s go back to shares.

 

[pause]

 

Go back to SkillBuilders project.

 

[pause]

 

Set up a new share.

 

[pause]

 

We’ll use our original user account when we set up, zfsuser1. Click on “Apply.” We now have our two shares. If we go back to our Window system here, go into network and map the network drive.

 

[pause]

 

Here we go. I’m on a Window 7 system, by the way. I can obviously choose drive letter for which the share to be associated.

 

[pause]

 

I won’t be too optimistic and use the machine name although it should work quite happily. I’ll use the IP address.

 

[pause]

 

We’ll connect using different credentials. That is different credentials to the user I’m currently logged in as on my laptop.

 

[pause]

 

Check “Remember.” Click on “Okay.” And it’s now trying to connect to the Storage Appliance.

 

If we go back to the analytics again, we can see the network and the CPU activity going on within the machine. We could add further statistics for disk performance, etc.

 

[pause]

 

>> Dave:  Another question in the queue, Mick.

 

>> Mick:  Yeah.

 

>> Dave:  Why is rollback time slow? Are there ways to speed the rollback of a large LUN?

 

[pause]

 

>> Mick:  I’m not aware that it is slow, Dave.

 

>> Dave:  I’ll ask for more clarification.

 

>> Mick:  Yeah, okay.

 

[pause]

 

Here we can see the various statistics being shown. Don’t forget, you can always look at the status screen to find out what’s going on. Now one last thing very quickly is I can log in on the command line and I get a prompt. It’s not a shallow prompt. If I hit “Tab,” conveniently it shows the all the different things I can do. So I can come into shares and then show. Hit “Tab” and then shows me what I can do within shares. That is the script option.

 

[pause]

 

Cd.. will get back up a little. Everything I’m doing through the GUI I can also do through the command line. In actual fact, when it comes to things about scripting, I can do more through the command line than I can do with the browser user interface.

 

That’s the end of the demonstration. I hope that’s given you a bit of an idea of what the software can do and also I’ve given you a bit of an overview of what the hardware options are.

 

Thank you very much for attending. Let us know if there are any more questions that we can get back to you. Thanks once again and happy Christmas. Over to you, Dave.

 

>> Dave:  Thank you so much, Mick. Fantastic demonstration and presentation. I appreciate it very much.

 

[pause]

 

Wishing everybody a happy holiday time. There’s an outstanding question in the queue about that rollback. I’d like for you to email that to us, Dave@Skillbuilders.com is just a great way to contact me. Dave@Skillbuilders.com, I’ll put it in the chat window here and we’ll get to the bottom of that. So if you have any further questions, folks, you can contact us via email or the phone number which I’ll put in the chat window as well. Everyone, have a happy Christmas time and happy holiday time. Thanks for attending today’s webinar. Thanks again, Mick, it was a great demonstration.

 

>> Mick:  Thanks, Dave. Thanks, everybody. Bye for now.

 

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